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Category: Product Spotlight

  1. What are the best scissors for sewing?

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    scissors for sewing

    At Sew Curvy I only stock quality products in the shop which I myself use and can recommend.    I have a variety of cutting tools in the studio but here are my favourite recommendations for sale:

    When I cut out patterns - any patterns - from corset patterns to dressmaking patterns, to purse patterns and everything in between - I use a 45mm rotary cutter and large cutting mat.  Many people who pass through my studio express terror at the thought of  amputating their fingers while using a rotary cutter but I say it couldn't be more simple and whats more, you get a much more accurate cut with a rotary cutter because you don't have to lift the fabric you're cutting at all, and you can keep the cutting blade sharp at all times with the use of replacement blades or a special sharpener for rotary blades.  The cut you get when using a rotary cutter is sharp, clean and even.  Once you get used to using one, you wont want to go back to traditional dressmaking scissors or tailors shears for anything!  

    In corsetry and dressmaking I find that the best size of blade for rotary cutting, is the standard 45mm.  Rotary cutters do come in all manner of shapes, sizes and formats, with standard, luxury and 'deluxe' versions and you can also get different types of blade too.  The 45mm size is big enough to cover distance quickly but small enough to negotiate tight curves efficiently.  Anything smaller would be tedious and anything bigger would be too clumsy.  The array of accessories for rotary cutters can be quite confusing but generally I find that a regular rotary cutter with retractable blade is the most cost effective and easiest tool to use and I prefer Olfa as a brand.   Handy tip for dull rotary blades:  When they are too dull to cut fabric, you can use them to cut paper, cardboard or interfacing with prescision.  Simply 'condemn' the not so sharp blade by paining a blob of nail polish on it to diferentiate it from your sharp blade.  The blade can be kept safe in the special plastic case which comes with every Olfa replacement blade.

    Scissors are of course useful at other times.  I tend only to use dressmaking shears for cutting lengths of fabric and of course it is absoloutely essential that you keep any dressmaking or fabric crafting scissors only for cutting fabric because cutting other materials such as paper, will dull the blades very quickly (although it is possible to have your scissors sharpened professionally in a hardware store).  If kept properly and treated well, a good pair of scissors will last a lifetime so it really is a false economy to buy cheap ones.  

    Applique scissors are sometimes known as duck bill scissors and are good for grading seams or working with layers of delicate fabrics - they have a lower blade which is wider than the top blade and this lower blade protects fabric underneath the scissors while the super sharp top blade cuts the fabric at hand.   We also have super sharp stork embroidery scissors in two sizes and these are a timeless classic - show me a grandmother who didn't own a pair!  I know I was always fascinated as a child by the little silver pair owned by my Nana and this is why these scissors do have a special place in my heart.  Practically, they are fantastic for precision cutting of small areas and for snipping thread ends very close  to your project. The applique scissors and the stork scissors on site are all made by quality German brand Klasse.  

    Small general  sewing scissors about 10cm (5") long are good for small cutting jobs like snipping notches, seam allowances, going around corners and other general fabric cutting where you need power and presicsion but don't want a large wiedly pair of scissors. I stock Fiskars small sewing scissors for this job as they are a lovely handy size  with very sharp pointy blades.  

    The humble stitch ripper should not be overlooked here.  It is every bit as important to keep a sharp seam ripper in your sewing tool box as it is to keep sharp sewing scissors and cutters to hand.   Dull blades = ripped fabric and shredded seams,  and seam rippers do not stay sharp for long - the more stitches you rip, the quicker the blade will blunt.  With this in mind,  I really don't believe in buying expensive seam rippers with fancy handles because they do need replacing frequently so you wont find anything above 50p at Sew Curvy and I frequently send out a free stich unpicker with big orders as a little token of thanks, because I think it is really really important for perfect sewing.  Infact, seam rippers are such a versatile sewing tool that some people write entire blog posts about their many and varied uses - here is one such blog post which will give you 9 other reasons why you need a seam ripper in your sewing box:  10 reasons to love your seam ripper

    scissors and cutters for sewing

     

     

     

     

  2. New products for 2014

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    new products

    There's a backlog of new products scheduled for upload in the next few weeks and there are so many that I can't actually fit them all on the very amateur collage I've made for this post.  There are:

    • lots of new embellishments, some of them kitschy, some classy
    • new colours of boning tape - red and grey - to match the colours of the coutils on sale
    • ew bindings - grey and natural to match 'dove' and 'biscuit' coutils
    • planned pattern release
    • kit re-branding to include easier kits and more 'complete course' kits
    • many many more lingerie accessories including siliconed hold up elastic, suspender clips and adjusters, several types of elastic, bra back fastners in two sizes and two colours and duo underwired bust forms
    • metal open ended zips
    • new fabrics - natural loomstate cotton drill and white cotton lawn plus some new coutil colours on the way and 
    • new threads in colours to match all the coutils on sale


    Coming soon we have black busks and pre-cut spiral boning

    I'm exhausted just thinking about all the possibilities!

  3. What is Corset Net or Mesh?

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    The corsetry net at Sew Curvy is made from a strong polyester fabric similar to nylon, and  suitable for all types of corsetry.  Unlike softer nets such as silk bobbinet or stretchy nets such as power net, this polyester net is like any other non stretch strong fabric and you can make a corset with the standard four inch reduction without worry that it will tear or buckle.   It is sheer, durable and very very strong and can be used on it's own or with lace and other sheer fabrics for extra drama.

    There are some considerations to bear in mind when working with sheer net.  You must use external fabric bone channels if you don't want the bones to show, and you need to consider the inside finish a bit more because unlike a solid fabric where things can be hidden with lining, with a sheer fabric, everything is on show.  However, with some imagination, spectacular effects can be achieved.

    This net can be ironed with a cool'ish iron, and can be sewn using regular polyester thread or with clear/invisible nylon thread, all of which are stocked at Sew Curvy.

    Available in black or natural - the net is BACK IN STOCK! So hurry and get yours, it does have wings!

    sophie corset 2 web

    corset: Clessidra (aka Sew Curvy)
    photographer: Catherine Day

    model: Sophie Roach

  4. What are the best eyelets for Corsetry?

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    For good corsetry, you need two part metal eyelets with a wide'ish collar - not too wide so as to look clumpy and bulky, and not so narrow that the fabric soon works its way from under the rim and the eyelet falls out, ruining the corset.  Also the shank of the eyelet must be not too long so the eyelet is loose when set, and not too short so that the eyelet cuts the fabric when set.  It's a fine balance !

    You need two part eyelets because the washer part of the eyelet, sandwiches and encloses the fabric safely and ensures a smooth finish to the inside of the corset.  One part eyelets which do not come with a washer,  are not strong enough for corsetry.  One part eyelets are commonly used for leather work - in belts or as a decorative feature, or in paper craft.  They are made of softer metal and when hammered, the back of the eyelet shaft collapses and can become jagged.  This will not only feel scratchy against the wearer and possibly cause injury or damage to other clothing, but it will certainly decrease the life of the corset substantially by causing wear to the fabric of the corset around the eyelet. 

    My favourite eyelets for corsetry are 5mm wide  however, not all eyelets are created equal!  You need different dies to set different eyelets. Dies are the little tools which help to set the eyelets properly either by pliers or by hammer.   Prym make it easy by providing an all inclusive eyelet kit which includes a set of dies that fit the separate Prym pliers which in turn do a marvellous job of not only punching a small hole for the eyelet, but setting them too, with hardly any effort.  However, these pliers only work with Prym eyelets and the same is true of all other eyelets - they only work with the die's that are made for them.  Annoying, but true.  Therefore, in order to make a good job of setting your eyelets, you do need the correct set of dies.

    Find your Prym Eylets in the shop here:  Prym Eyelets and pliers for corset making.

     

    eyelets