Q&A about corset making

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Category: Tips and tricks

  1. Valentines Inspiration

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    rosy red corset with gold busk
    Red rosebud coutil corset with golden busk and golden eyelets.  A perfect combination of colour and style.

    It's nearly valentines day and we have lots of RED things to celebrate!  Here's a few little pallets of inspiration for your valentines projects.

    First of all, we got some beautiful Rosebud coutil in a rich red.  I can't help but call this "Rosy Red" coutil - it's just so rosy and so red!

    Rosebud corset coutil in red

    We also have a bright red satin - this has a more 'orange' tone than the rosy red which is definately a blue toned red and ofcourse there's the staple favourite rosebud coutil which is black with red roses.

    valentines corsetry inspiration
    Red satin coutil paired with a selection of black guipure trims.
    Also pictured are red knicker elastic which can be used as a frilly trim
    and our red picot binding which is just gorgeous and so easy to use.

    Our red accessories all go beautifully with all red and red patterned coutils - our sturdy plastic zips come in a few lengths and are very good for corsetry.  To use them, stitch them in the CF of the corset as you would any other zip, but make boning channels either side of the teeth (the zip fabric is wide enough to do this with our 6mm flat steels) to keep the front nice and straight.

    valentines special corsetry inspo

    Red zips, black busks, suspenders clips, and red roses.

    Trim your corsets with red satin binding, or picot edged binding, or even red grosgrain ribbon which is my new favourite type of binding.  The picot binding is super easy - you just sandwich the edge of your corset between the fold of the binding, clip down with wonder clips, and stitch down.

    Couldn't be easier!

    grosgrain binding
    Red 25mm grosgrain ribbon is a) a perfect match for the rosy red coutil and also a lovely way to bind a corset.  I also use it as a waist tape.

    To use grosgrain ribbon as your binding, take the appropriate length required, fold in half and press with an iron - not too hot as the ribbon is polyester and will distort if the iron is too hot, then fold the edges in towards the centre crease and press.  This is what I call 'extreme binding' because it makes a very thin but very elegant binding - you have to be quite confident to give it a try but practice makes perfect!

    Our black lacy trims are all perfect for your classic red and black boudior feel and all are easy to use.

    And to celebrate Valentines properly, we've introduced 3 special edition valentines corset kits which are limited in number and will only be available until 14 February!

    Victoria Valentine corsetry kit Saucy Sophia kit Sophia Valentine Corset Kit

    The "Victoria Valentine" kit includes rosy red coutil, red trimmings and our pretty Victorian style velvet ribbon and lace trim.  This will make a pretty Victorian style mid - overbust corset (depending on bust size).

    The "Saucy Sophia" corset kit includes rosebud coutil in red and black, with red trimmings, suspender elastic, and suspender grips.  This will make a beautiful lingerie / boudoir corset

    The 'Smooth Sophia' kit includes red satin coutil, a gold busk with gold eyelets, red trimmings, and some pretty "little crowns' guipure lace trim in black.

    To finish, we have some super silky flossing thread new in!  It's the Seta Real brand which is my favourite and comes in lots of colours now which will go with all the red things!

    What will you be making for Valentines?

    Links:

    Buy your Valentine a corset kit:  Valentines Special Corset Kits

    Video Tutorial : How to use wonder clips with picot edge binding

  2. What are bust forms?

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    At Sew Curvy we have quite a large range of bust forms.  We have them in various sizes, colours and types.

    There are the regular fabric style bust form which are quite 'round' in appearance and are made of a moulded fabric which feels a little bit like a fine felt.  And we have the 'swimwear' version which are more flexible in feel and I think, more realistic in shape.
    photo 


    The regular bust forms can be used in dressmaking, the swimwear bust forms can obviously be used in swimwear and bikinis (or even corseted swimming costumes?)  and both types of bust form can be used in corsetry.  What would you do with them?  You can either use them to make a 'modest' cup under a sheer panel - ie, the panel will still look sheer at the bust but you won't be able to see the 'naughty bits' - or you can insert them into the bust in dresses and corsets for more shape or dimension, or you can use them as a mould for cupped corsets.  The range of uses for these marvellous things is actually quite limitless.  Just think about it.  Use a bust form to drape a cup pattern for your cupped corset.  Once this is done, attach your covered cups to an underbust corset pattern.  Experiment, explore, have fun with them!

    The regular forms come in the cup sizes you may be familiar with but are a bit on the small size, and the swimwear cups come in small, medium or large and look out for a cupped corset masterclass at Sew Curvy HQ, in the Spring with the wonderful Alison Campbell of Crikey Aphrodite!

  3. Unpicking

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    I often put a little freebie into my parcels going out to regular customers - only something little as a token of appreciation for their continued support of my business.  I bought a big bag of seam rippers from my wholesaler, to sell on the site, but also to use as a little free gift.  However,  so far, haven't put any of these into a package unless they have been ordered.  Why? I  am frightened people might get the wrong idea about my opinion of their sewing! - a bit like giving someone smellies for Christmas .. 

    The thing is, a sharp seam ripper is an absolutely vital tool for any seamstress or corsetiere.  Believe it or not, seam rippers get blunt very quickly.  The better you are at sewing, the blunter your seam ripper is likely to be.  It's a sad fact but I probably use my seam ripper, more than my sewing machine! 

    Now these seam rippers are the best I can find and the cheapest!  They cost £0.50p.  I don't believe in spending lots of money on a seam ripper because you do have to replace them so often.  Before I bought in bulk, I would buy 4 or 5 of these seam rippers at a time from my local haberdasher.   I still always make sure I have a personal stock of these and mark my current one with a blob of nail varnish - this way, the new sharp ones don't get used until the current one is blunt and in the bin. 

    If you get into the habit of using a sharp seam ripper, you will soon know and appreciate the difference between a sharp one and a blunt one - a sharp seam ripper will unpick your stitches faster and with much less risk to the rest of your sewing.  So! If you haven't replaced your seam ripper for a while, I urge you to assess the situation and replace  your seam rippers frequently for best sewing results. And if you do happen to get one from me that you didn't order, it's a gift but not in a bad way ;)

    seam rippers